The truth is hard. 

Sorry folks but there is no such thing as the perfect diet. 

No. The Vegan way of eating is not for everyone. No. The Paleo diet is not for everyone. No. Not everyone has to avoid gluten. No. There is no one food group that is inherently bad (as long as we are only including whole, real foods). 

Diet gurus would have you believe differently because they want to be right. There is no right or wrong. My vision is that we figure out what works for us as individuals. And that we see this discovery as a process and a journey. Have fun with it!

If you first want to get an idea if you're diet is working well for you right now, take the "Best Diet for You" Quiz to get started.

Here I provide an overview of some common dietary perspectives. 

My goal is to be as unbiased as possible and to present the facts, as well as the logistics.

I provide this info so that you can consider different eating styles and if they would work for you or not. 

Within the context of any prescribed eating style I strongly encourage you to refine your eating style to suit your needs, your lifestyle, and your desires. And I even more strongly encourage you to pay careful attention to your body. It will usually tell you if you are doing what's best for your body or not. Pay attention but please don't obsess. 

As a bonus please sign up to get a free 3-day meal plan made up of gluten-free, dairy-free, low-glycemic, and super delicious recipes!

Major dietary perspectives out there

(listed alphabetically)

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Calorie-Restricted Diet

This way of eating restricts daily caloric intake. 

There are endless versions out there of calorie-restricted diets. Most of them are designed for weight loss, but some people follow calorie-restrictive diets for the proven health benefits and for longevity. 

Restricting calories can be done by eating smaller portions and/or by eating less fat. 

In my opinion the healthiest and most sustaining way to do a calorie-restricted diet is to eat a LOT of vegetables of all kinds and to watch your portion sizes. Aiming to eat veggies of all colors: white, purple, green, red, orange, yellow, and aquamarine (think seaweed) on a daily basis will keep this way of eating fun and highly nutritious. 

Another tip is to think of it this way...if you are trying to restrict calories then eat those foods that contain the least calories. Fat has 9 calories per gram but protein and carbs have only 4 calories per gram. So it makes sense that you should limit fat to keep calories low and to emphasize vegetables and fruits to keep up the variety. Fiber-rich foods are also great because they are satisfying and keep hunger at bay. 

Eating lean meats, fish, and beans for the main sources of protein keeps calories down and also can keep hunger at bay. Nuts, seeds, fatty fruits, dairy, and fatty meats and fish will move those calories up really quickly so eat those foods in great moderation. 

One of the potential main drawbacks of calorie restriction is hunger. If you have a big appetite this way of eating might not be for you. Or maybe you should just get used to eating less? The only way to know is to try it out.....that is, if this is appealing to you. Listen to your intuition. 

If you have to lose weight then calorie-restriction is the mainstream, USDA-sanctioned way to do so. However, it has been proven time and again that both a calorie-restricted diet AND a low-carb diet (which is sort of the opposite because it does not restrict calories, rather it restricts carbs) are effective for weight loss.

So if you are wondering which one is for you, my advice is to choose the style that appeals to you the most. If the idea of eating tons of veggies, and moderate portions of beans, lean meats, fruit, and whole grains sounds like fun then give it a try. On the flip side, if the idea of eating as much oils and fats as you like (think avocados, cooking with lots of olive oil, and hefty doses of high-quality salad dressing), without counting calories, is appealing and you think you could do without the grains, starchy veggies, and beans, then look at the Ketogenic diets. If you want a bit more moderation with the fats and oils but believe that carbs are your Kryptonite then check out the Paleo/Primal way of eating. 

The only way to know if this diet meets your individual needs is to give it a try. If you are attracted to it, there is a chance it will. Most people will shy away from a diet they inherently know will not supply THEIR needs in macronutrients, but this is not always true. What is always true is that you should observe your body carefully (but not obsessively) and make sure you are being nourished properly. 

If you are doing this diet long term please be sure to assess how you are doing in an objective manner. Blindly following dietary programs is not going to help YOU figure out what's right for YOU. And remember that needs can change over time so what once worked for you might not always work for you. Pay attention! 

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Healing Diets

There is a very LONG list of healing diets out there based on individual needs....

With the modern epidemics of obesity, diabetes, cancer, heart disease, autoimmune, mental health issues, dementia, neurological issues, autism, chronic fatigue syndrome, and many, many more, some people are turning to specific healing diets for help. 

All of the ways of eating that are listed on this webpage, when done thoughtfully and properly, can be considered healing diets. Most of the healing diets in this section here are offshoots of those other diets listed on this webpage. 

In general, healing diets are meant to be short-term. Sometimes the healing process can be long but just keep in perspective that the main goal is to be able to eat a varied diet rich in all food groups. 

Going through all the healing diets would be impossible here. First of all, I would probably miss a ton of them out there. Secondly, it just would be an enormous amount of information.

So I will list some common and well-known healing diets out there, and I will also list some that are not as well-known but that we use often in my practice. This list is not meant to be exhaustive. It is meant to offer some approaches that you may have never heard of or considered before. 

Healing Diet List 

(in alphabetical order)

Anti-Candida

This way of eating is for those that have Candida or yeast overgrowth. This can be occurring in the GI tract and even spill over into the peripheral circulation. 

The main goal of this diet is to avoid sugars of all kinds, which can be a source of fuel for yeast organisms. Foods to avoid are: high-carb fruit, gluten, processed meat, some forms of dairy, foods that could be contaminated with mold or that naturally contain mold (think Roquefort), foods that contain yeast such as most breads and vinegar, alcohol, and more. 

To learn more about the Anti-Candida diet, go here. 


Autoimmune Paleo

The AIP diet is pretty restrictive but in my experience has great results for those with autoimmune disease. 

AIP avoids grains, dairy, eggs, legumes, nuts, seeds, nightshade vegetables and spices, sugar, and alcohol. Here is a link to one great website to learn more about the AIP way of eating and autoimmune in general.


Dairy-Free

Used for lactose intolerance, dairy sensitivity or dairy allergy. Here is a link to site that has tons of resources for recipes, FAQ, and more. 

And I have used this site for years as a source for delicious gluten-free and dairy-free recipes. They've ALL been tasty! 


Elimination Diets

Avoids one or more groups of food based on their potential to cause inflammatory responses in any given individual. This can include avoiding dairy, gluten, grains, or other specific foods such as eggs, corn, soy, almonds, etc. Some people do allergy and food sensitivity testing to identify which foods are problematic. Other people do elimination diets and remove one or more food group and watch for any changes in how they feel. The "classic" elimination diet excludes: gluten, dairy, corn, soy, eggs, peanuts, sugar, processed food, alcohol, and caffeine, but there are many variations on this.

These diets are usually done by people with GI issues, skin issues, allergies, asthma, autoimmune, mood issues, and joint pain but may be helpful for anyone dealing with ANY health challenge. 


Food Combining

Food combining involves eating only one type of a dominant food group at a time. For example you would not eat meat/fish with starch (grains, starchy veggies) but you could eat meat or a starch with any non-starchy veggies. You are supposed to wait 3-4 hours before eating from another dominant category. The four dominant categories are: fruit, starch, animal protein, and nuts, seeds, and dried fruit. 

You can learn more about Food Combining here. The Body Ecology Diet is an example of a well-established food combining diet. It also is an anti-candida diet. 


GAPS Diet

The Gut and Psychology Syndrome Diet is an offshoot of the SCD (Specific Carbohydrate Diet) created by Dr. Natasha Campbell-Mcbride. It is generally used for those with GI issues, autoimmune, autism, chronic inflammation, psychiatric disorders, neurological problems, and much more. 

This healing diet is a multi-phasic diet that starts off by excluding just about everything except homemade bone broth, the juice from fermented vegetables, soft-cooked vegetables and slow-cooked meat, poultry, and fish. Slowly other foods are introduced such as live culture yogurt, soft-cooked eggs, and avocados. Bone broth and fermented foods remain a staple throughout. Over time the list of food gets longer but people move as slowly or quickly as they need to based on their symptoms.   

To learn more about the GAPS diet go here


Gluten-Free

Used for gluten intolerance, gluten sensitivity, and Celiac disease. Here is a link to a website with a detailed list of foods that are gluten-free and glutenous. 

And I have used this site for years as a source for delicious gluten-free and dairy-free recipes. They've ALL been tasty!  


Grain-Free

Grains can be very pro-inflammatory for some people. Avoiding all grains may be useful for anyone with GI issues, chronic inflammation, autoimmune, etc. Some people find avoiding grains a great way to lose weight. Any site that offers info on the Paleo, Primal, or Ketogenic diets will have resources for a grain-free diet. 


Low FODMAP/SIBO Diet

Restricts food high in fermentable fibers and sugars such as lactose, galactans (in beans), fructose, polyols (sugar alcohols), and more. This way of eating is specific for SIBO (small intestine bacterial overgrowth), which results in many GI symptoms such as gas, bloating, constipation, diarrhea, GERD/reflux, and digestive issues. If you have one or more of these symptoms or you have been diagnosed with IBS then I strongly encourage you to learn about SIBO. Here is a link to a site that has a lot of good information about SIBO and even has a quiz you can take.


Low Histamine

Restricts food high in histamine such as fermented food, aged cheese, processed meats, canned meats and fish, shellfish, nuts, alcohol, and oh, so much more.....

This diet is very specific for people with histamine overload or intolerance or mast cell activation syndrome. This site is an excellent authority on the low histamine diet. 

If you suspect you have mast cell activation syndrome, read more here.


Low Oxalate

Restricts food high in oxalates such as beans, nuts, dark leafy green veggies, coffee, chocolate, and much more. For those that have kidney stones, frequent UTIs, vaginal pain, chronic GI issues, gout, or joint or muscle pain it might be worthwhile to learn more about this way of eating.

Unlike dairy or gluten, the foods that contain oxalates may not be so obvious. So, to do the diet properly you'll need a good list. I'm linking to this list because it contains actual amounts of oxalates in foods (more helpful than just "high" or "low"). 


Low Salicylate

Restricts food high in salicylates such as dried fruit, peppers, tomatoes, almonds, peanuts, and processed meats. Unlike dairy or gluten, the foods that contain salicylates may not be so obvious. So, to do the diet properly you'll need a good list.

Here is a list based on foods that have been tested (there are lots of lists out there that are based on individual experiences and not actual testing so be careful of that).

And their info on understanding salicylate sensitivity might be helpful for those not sure if they have this sensitivity or not.


Low Sulfur

Restricts food high in sulfur-containing amino acids such as garlic, onions, eggs, cruciferous vegetables, and more. Sulfur intolerance can show up with similar symptoms to histamine intolerance. If you want to learn more about sulfur intolerance please read here. And to learn more and see a list read here. 


Patricia Kane Membrane Stabilizing Diet

This diet was created by Dr. Patricia Kane and is designed for those with neurological illness but can be used by anyone interested in a modified Ketogenic diet that aims to help rebuild healthy cell membranes. In my practice I have used this diet for conditions ranging from ALS to metabolic syndrome. I myself eat this diet most of the time. It is a high-fat, low-carb diet so it's not for everyone but it can be a very powerful healing diet. 

The PK Diet avoids grains, sugar, and high carb foods and encourages consumption of high quality fatty acids in the form of omega 3 and omega 6 oils, as well as vegetables and berries. 

This is a detox diet that is part of a larger protocol but even by itself the dietcan be healing. This page gives a good overview of the PK diet. If you are interested in doing this diet please contact me. 


SCD 

The Specific Carbohydrate Diet was created by Elaine Gottschall to help treat her daugther's severe case of ulcerative colitis. The diet has since become a cornerstone of other healing diets and has helped thousands of people with GI issues. The diet avoids grains, some beans, starches, and processed food and allows meat, poultry, fish, eggs, nuts, and low-carb fruit.  For a list of what's allowed and not allowed check this out

The diet is intended for those with Crohn's, colitis, Celiac, cystic fibrosis, diverticulitis, and chronic diarrhea. You can learn more here. 

As a bonus please sign up to get a free 3-day meal plan made up of gluten-free, dairy-free, low-glycemic, and super delicious recipes!


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Ketogenic Diet

These diets are very high in fat and VERY low in carbohydrates, while being low to moderate in protein. 

Unfortunately there are lot of misconceptions out there about Ketogenic diets. 

When done properly Keto diets are high in fat, moderate to low in protein, and very low in carbs. The most commonly used style of the Keto diet for weight loss limits NET carbs to 20 grams per day. This is so low that if you look too long at a carby food like pasta or pizza you might go over your limit. Just kidding! But remember that there is also the "Modified Keto" diet, which can go up to 50 grams of NET carbs/day. 

Although this diet is very restrictive it can be done relatively easily and there are many foods that can be enjoyed. 

I am going to describe a Keto diet, done right. I'm an expert in the Keto diet so you can take my word for it. Don't listen to people that know little to nothing about this way of eating (you'll recognize those people because they usually claim the Keto diet is high in protein). 

The main sources of fat on this diet should be healthy, high quality oils. By this I mean: cold-pressed, FRESH seed and nuts oils, extra virgin olive oil, coconut oil, and MCT oil (Medium Chain Triglycerides). Meat, fish, poultry, seeds, nuts, dairy, and fatty fruits provide the rest of the fatty acids. Be careful NOT to eat too much dairy, which can be a common mistake (dairy raises insulin in some people so may reduce the blood glucose beneficial effects). 

Protein should be somewhat limited with this way of eating. Of course protein needs really vary from person to person so you'll have to figure out what works best for you. Generally we recommend staying within the guidelines of .8-1.25 grams of protein per kilogram. If you are a professional athlete or heavy duty lifter then maybe you need more. 

Carbs should come mostly from fresh veggies. There are lots of low-carb veggies out there so you can conceivably be eating 15 servings of veggies per day even at only 20 grams of net carbs. Once you get in all your veggies you can have a few berries, fatty fruits, seeds, and nuts. But those have carbs too so be careful!

There are some potential issues with the Ketogenic diet, especially if you are only eating 20 grams of net carbs per day. Some of these issues could include: loss of electrolytes, fat mal-digestion, not enough fiber, and more. If you do embark on a Ketogenic diet, please do so well-informed. 

The Ketogenic diet, when done correctly, causes your body to produce ketones. Ketones are inherently anti-inflammatory, which can be therapeutic for some people. There are many other potential health benefits from this way of eating (such as blood sugar control, weight loss, and improved lipid profiles) but of course it's not for everyone! 

The only way to know if this diet meets your individual needs is to give it a try. If you are attracted to it, there is a chance it will. Most people will shy away from a diet they inherently know will not supply THEIR needs in macronutrients, but this is not always true. What is always true is that you should observe your body carefully (but not obsessively) and make sure you are being nourished properly. 

If you are doing this diet long term please be sure to assess how you are doing in an objective manner. Blindly following dietary programs is not going to help YOU figure out what's right for YOU. And remember that needs can change over time so what once worked for you might not always work for you. Pay attention! 

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Paleo/Primal

The Paleo way of eating excludes grains, processed foods, beans, dairy, and potatoes. Primal usually includes raw or unprocessed dairy. 

The Paleo and Primal diets are based on what is believed to be the diet of hunter/gatherers thousands of years ago. Lately people are referring to this way of eating as "low-carb" but really the term low-carb is more broad and is not necessarily restricted by concepts such as avoiding dairy or eating whole foods. 

This way of eating strongly emphasizes whole foods. It generally tends to be relatively rich in protein, moderate in fat, and low in carbohydrates. 

Those that follow a paleo or primal diet will generally eat a lot of vegetables and fruits (mostly berries), as well as nuts and seeds. 

The main sources of protein for those eating a Paleo diet are meat, poultry, fish, eggs, nuts, and seeds. When someone is following a Primal way of eating they will include raw dairy as well. 

Generally lean-meats are emphasized over fatty meats, and fatty fish (salmon, sardines, anchovies, and herring) is encouraged. These foods, plus nuts, seeds, and fatty fruit (avocado, olives, and coconut) and their oils, are the major source of fatty acids on a Paleo diet. Primal eating includes raw dairy as an additional source of fat. 

The foods highest in fiber are beans and whole-grains, therefore this diet CAN be limited in fiber. Paleo and Primal fans would argue that vegetables, fruits, nuts, and seeds provide ample protein. This may be true. But for some people it is not enough.

The only way to know if this diet meets your individual needs is to give it a try. If you are attracted to it, there is a chance it will. Most people will shy away from a diet they inherently know will not supply THEIR needs in macronutrients, but this is not always true. What is always true is that you should observe your body carefully (but not obsessively) and make sure you are being nourished properly. 

If you are someone that really enjoys eating veggies, fish, and lean meats and feels the need to stay away from grains then this diet might be for you. Many people choose this way of eating in order to lose weight, thinking a low-carb diet will help with that. Others want to reduce their intake of grains in order to reduce inflammation or to help stabilize their blood sugar. 

This diet has some healing versions such as "Autoimmune Paleo", which is a very restrictive diet that can help reduce inflammation and clear up gut issues. Other ways of eating that might generally fall under this category are the GAPS (Gut and Psychology Syndrome) and SCD (Specific Carbohydrate Diet) diets, but they are more specific with their guidelines than the typical Paleo way of eating. The GAPS and SCD diets are usually used by people looking to reduce inflammation, heal gut disorders, and/or deal with some other health challenge. 

The main nutrients that could potentially be lacking with this way of eating are carbohydrates or fiber. Some people that require more fiber follow most of the Paleo or Primal guidelines and eat beans and/or small amounts of the fiber-rich whole grains such as whole wheat. Others feel they need more carbohydrates but not as much fiber and therefore focus on whole grains such as wild rice, oatmeal, quinoa, and millet (which may then no longer be considered Paleo or Primal by purists but the point I'm trying to make is that we NEED to individualize diets to suit our needs). 

If you are doing this diet long term please be sure to assess how you are doing in an objective manner. Blindly following dietary programs is not going to help YOU figure out what's right for YOU. And remember that needs can change over time so what once worked for you might not always work for you. Pay attention! 

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Vegan 

The vegan way of eating excludes all forms of animal-sourced foods including meat, poultry, fish, dairy, and honey.

The way to do this diet properly is to eat lots and lots of veggies!

Juicing is a great way to get in lots of veggie nutrition and actually serves as a good source of vegetable-based protein. Aiming to eat veggies of all colors: white, purple, green, red, orange, yellow, and aquamarine (think seaweed) on a daily basis is also a good practice.

Protein should come from legumes, nuts, seeds, whole grains, and vegetable juice. Each meal should feature a good mix of these foods (well veggie juice can be done just once a day). Because this diet excludes meat, poultry, fish, dairy, and eggs some may say it is too low in protein. Proponents of the Vegan diet would argue that Vegan foods provide ample protein.

The only way to know if this diet meets your individual needs is to give it a try. If you are attracted to it, there is a chance it will. Most people will shy away from a diet they inherently know will not supply THEIR needs in macronutrients, but this is not always true. What is always true is that you should observe your body carefully (but not obsessively) and make sure you are being nourished properly. 

Fat should come from fatty fruits (avocado, coconut, olives), nuts, seeds, and the oils of these foods. There are some forms of Vegan diets that encourage very low consumption of fatty acids. 

When done correctly, the Vegan way of eating is super rich in fiber, moderate to low in protein, and fat levels vary but generally it tends to be a low to moderate fat diet. 

Most proponents of the Vegan way of eating promote the consumption of whole, unprocessed foods and avoiding highly processed foods and refined grains and sweeteners.

If you are someone that loves, loves, loves veggies and is not a big fan of meat, fish, or eggs you might do very well on a vegan diet. 

One thing to keep in mind is that when eating a vegan diet you will have less intake of iron, B12, zinc, and potentially other minerals and vitamins. It is important to take a good multivitamin to supplement this diet.

This way of eating also is very low in saturated fat and cholesterol, which is may be exactly what some people are looking for. For those people that feel they need the saturated fat and cholesterol then this is probably not the diet for you.

Also, avoiding fish and seafood will limit fish oil in the diet (seaweed has some!!) so you may want to take a supplemental form of vegan EPA and DHA from marine algae for this. On the plus side, if you are following a vegan diet properly you should be eating lots of leafy greens, nuts, and seeds, which are a great source of the essential fatty acids alpha linolenic acid (ALA) and linoleic acid (LA). ALA can be converted to EPA and DHA in the body under normal, healthy conditions. 

If you are doing this diet long term please be sure to assess how you are doing in an objective manner. Blindly following dietary programs is not going to help YOU figure out what's right for YOU. And remember that needs can change over time so what once worked for you might not always work for you. Pay attention! 


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Vegetarian

The vegetarian way of eating excludes all animal flesh but allows dairy and eggs. Some people eat a vegetarian diet and also eat fish (this is known as "pescatarian")

The vegetarian way of eating should include lots and lots of veggies, high-quality dairy and eggs, whole, unprocessed grains, legumes, nuts, seeds, sea vegetables, and fruit.

I always recommend to people following a vegetarian diet that they include at least one major source of protein at EACH meal. This could be beans, dairy, and/or eggs. Nuts and seeds are a great way to boost protein intake. Because this diet excludes meat, poultry, and fish some would say it does not provide adequate protein. Those loving the vegetarian diet would argue that not everyone needs that much protein. 

The only way to know if this diet meets your individual needs is to give it a try. If you are attracted to it, there is a chance it will. Most people will shy away from a diet they inherently know will not supply THEIR needs in macronutrients, but this is not always true. What is always true is that you should observe your body carefully (but not obsessively)and make sure you are being nourished properly. 

This way of eating can be high in fat or low in fat, depending on the tastes of the individual. Good sources of fat are fatty fruits (avocado, olive, and coconut) and their oils, whole-fat dairy, and nuts and seeds. 

When done properly the vegetarian diet should be very rich in fiber. Sources of fiber include: whole grains, beans, nuts, seeds, veggies, and fruit. 

If you are someone that loves, loves, loves veggies and is not a big fan of meat you might do very well on a vegetarian diet. 

Some people love the idea of a vegetarian diet but also want to get some animal protein in the form of fish. When this is done then fish becomes another major source of protein. And when fatty fish is consumed (salmon, sardines, anchovies, and herring) then it becomes an important source of fish oils. 

One thing to keep in mind is that when eating a vegetarian diet you may have less intake of iron, B12, zinc, and potentially other minerals and vitamins. It is important to take a good multivitamin to supplement this diet. 

For those not doing a pescatarian diet, avoiding fish and seafood will limit fish oil in the diet (seaweed has some!!), so you may want to take a supplemental form of vegan EPA and DHA from marine algae for this. On the plus side, if you are following a Vegetarian diet properly you should be eating lots of leafy greens, nuts, and seeds, which are a great source of the essential fatty acids alpha linolenic acid (ALA) and linoleic acid (LA). ALA can be converted to EPA and DHA in the body under normal, healthy conditions. 

If you are doing this diet long term please be sure to assess how you are doing in an objective manner. Blindly following dietary programs is not going to help YOU figure out what's right for YOU. And remember that needs can change over time so what once worked for you might not always work for you. Pay attention! 

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Whole Foods/Real Foods Diet

This way of eating puts more of an emphasis on eating whole foods than on macronutrients or avoiding any one whole food group.

A "whole-foods" or "real foods" way of eating emphasizes eating foods in their whole form and does not restrict any particular food groups. This is somewhat like a traditional food diet in that the idea is to step away from processed foods and eat how people would have eaten before everything was so industrialized. The Weston A Price diet is one example of a traditional, whole-foods way of eating. 

This way of eating could overlap with many eating styles out there. You could be eating a Vegan diet OR a Paleo diet (which are quite different) and both could be followed as a whole foods diet. Of course there are lots of people out there eating protein bars or vegan "meat" that are definitely not concerning themselves with whole foods. 

In my humble nutritionist opinion, all of the ways of eating listed on this page should emphasize whole foods over processed food as much as possible. The closer we get to the original form of any given food, the more nutritious it is.

The range of styles of a whole foods diet can vary from one person eating 100% raw, unprocessed foods to another making homemade sausage, and bone broth and grinding whole grains to make sourdough bread from scratch.

It's up to you to find the degree and style of whole foods that is best for you and your lifestyle. But let's all make an effort! The fact that whole foods are superior to processed foods is the one thing all conscientious diet gurus should agree on.

I like to sometimes recommend to people what I call a "Balanced Diet". The main tenets of this way of eating are to eat predominantly whole and real foods and to pay attention to portion sizes. All foods and food groups are allowed in moderation. I also emphasize eating only 3 meals/day and not snacking, as well as not eating after 8 PM. This is similar to the Mastering Leptin diet.

This way of eating is very therapeutic for those that have been yo-yo dieting or "obsessing" about food to their detriment. It takes away a lot of the angst and fear that some people develop around eating. Some are overly worried about calories or carbs, others are scared to eat certain food groups such as dairy, soy, or gluten.

This is in a way the true healing diet because it is probably closer to how people ate before we had a bunch of doctors and nutritionist telling us what to do. I'm not minimizing the importance of avoiding certain food groups. That works for some. But for those that just want to eat a well-balanced, nutritious diet this may be the best choice.